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It's all about choices: the Matrix is real. We Are Spiritual Beings having a Human Experience.

It's all about choices: the Matrix is real. We Are Spiritual Beings having a Human Experience.

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Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, NY/NJ, Tennessee, Washington...the U.S., and Southeast Asia & China, United States
With a B.A. in psychology and a masters in education, I'm a psychological counselor-advisor, college professor-academic adviser, writer, music journalist: a Cosmic Tuning Fork; LightWorker; Intuitive Mentor. I Activate People in understanding their Life Goals, individual Soul Lessons, and Inner Truths to achieve personal growth & happiness, and have fun too. mitchLOP8@yahoo.com

Saturday, March 23, 2019

The healing abilities of tree resins


(Thanks to the original source: http://www.herbs-info.com/blog/tree-resins-an-amazing-yet-forgotten-natural-remedy/)

Tree Resins: An Amazing Yet Forgotten Natural Remedy

Trees have been among our greatest allies since ancient times. They play a very important role in the production of oxygen and the absorption of carbon dioxide from the environment. Trees have also become a source of wood, paper, and other materials used in our everyday lives.
However here is another fact that many are not aware of – trees deserve a place among our lists of potential natural remedies. We tend to think of herbs as small leafy plants nestled between rocks in a herb garden. But herbalism encompasses all varieties of plants. The thousands of species of trees offer us a fantastic array of therapeutic potential.

Some famous remedies are made from trees. Taxol – the cancer medicine – is made from the Yew tree. We also have essential oils made from trees – such as eucalyptus, sandalwood, cedarwood, cypress and so on.

Scientific Studies Demonstrating Benefits Of Tree Resins
Tree resin is a defensive barrier secreted by a tree to protect itself from insects and pathogens. Hence it is logical that it will be an excellent remedy for preventing infections; it has natural antimicrobial properties – properties that protect the tree and can apparently protect humans too. Different studies have been published over the years that focus on the ability of resin from various trees in fighting pathogenic microorganisms.

In an astonishing study, Wilson, et. al. in 2013 found that tree resin harvested by honey bees showed significant antimicrobial properties and was able to fight off a bee bacterial pathogen called Paenibacillus larvae. While Wilson’s study focused on the bee and its ecosystem, the study’s results indicate tree resins’ antimicrobial ability – which may be applicable to the human environment. [1]
In 2012, Rautio, et. al. discovered that natural coniferous resin from the Norway Spruce had very significant anti-fungal effects in vitro. The resin was pitted against various human pathogens, mainly Candida, dermatophytes, and opportunistic fungi. The study’s results showed that the resin was able to work against the dermatophytes but not Candida or opportunistic fungi. The resin was able to damage the dermatophytes’ cell wall and cause cell death. [2]

A few years back in 2008, dos Santos published a study on different tree oils and how they tested against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeast, and dermatophytes. Among the oils included in the study was resin oil and it was tested against Staphylococcus aureus. The resin oil was able to cause lysis or breakage in the bacteria, indicating that it is an effective treatment against that microbe. Staph infections are very common and can cause respiratory tract and skin problems. [3]
An unconventional use of tree resin was the focus of da Silva’s study published in 2015 in The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology. The researchers used oil-resin from a tropical rainforest tree and found that it exhibited in vitro cell death in endometriotic stromal cultures, which is found in cases of endometriosis. The study suggests that using tree resin can be a novel approach to managing this gynecological condition. [4]

Using Tree Resins
It’s advisable to treat tree resins as you would treat any other essential oil. They should not be ingested, and should be diluted before skin application. Resins can sometimes be collected from coniferous trees such as pines when the resin oozes from the tree and drips down.
There are many sources of tree resin all over the world – however the best website we have found (no affiliation) is Pruitt’s Tree Resin. Check out their fascinating history page and their store for natural healing products made directly from the trees.

References:
[1] Wilson, M., et. al. (2013). Metabolomics reveals the origins of antimicrobial plant resins collected by honey bees. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24204850
[2] Rautio, M., et. al. (2012). In vitro fungistatic effects of natural coniferous resin from Norway spruce (Picea abies). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22179415
[3] dos Santos, A., et. al. (2008). Antimicrobial activity of Brazilian copaiba oils obtained from different species of the Copaifera genus. https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1055/s-2007-986901
[4] da Silva, H., et. al. (2015). The oil-resin of the tropical rainforest tree Copaifera langsdorffii reduces cell viability, changes cell morphology and induces cell death in human endometriotic stromal cultures. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26407531

Friday, March 1, 2019

Fatherhood Is Sacred: Heartwarming Pictures of Indigenous Fathers With Their Children


C/o and thanks to http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2016/06/fatherhood-is-sacred-heartwarming.html
“The family is the oldest and most important institution in society and is at the heart of the Native American and indigenous cultures.” “There is no other work more important than fatherhood.”
Another important part of fatherhood in traditional teachings is being a good role model for children. Being a role model can very challenging for Aboriginal(Indigenous/Native) men who grew up without the presence of strong, caring fathers and grandfathers in their lives.

‘It’s about being strong, being responsible and being recognised as proud fathers and men in your community.

A father is a man who takes responsibility for the children in his life. Many men grow up without a positive, healthy role model of fatherhood. It is often when men are holding their baby for the first time that they take a good hard look at what it means to raise a child.

Remember that being a father is a life-long commitment: Your role as a father starts before pregnancy and continues throughout your child’s entire life. As your child grows, your relationship will grow and change. Children need to know that you will always be there and will always love them.

Maori Child With Father

Native South African father embracing his young child. Zulu warriors

 "I have the future in my hands."
Aztec (Mexica) Father

 Indigenous Child and his father

 As an eagle prepares its young to leave the nest with all the skills and knowledge it needs to participate in life, in the same manner so will I guide my children. I will use the culture to prepare them for life.
-A Fathers Job

 In the baby lies the future of the world. Mother must hold the baby close so that the baby knows it is his
world but the father must take him to the highest hill so that he can see what his world is like.
- Native Proverb

 Xingu father and child

 Aboriginal father and child - Australia

 Father and Son - The chichimeca tribe

Father and Child - Kuikuro Indigenous people from Amazon Rainforest

 Father & son - Rainforest

Mexica dancer blessing the child

Native Alaskan Inupiat father and infant daughter: Photo Credit Clark Mishler

 Father and son resting between dances at the Soboba Powwow Credit: Jim Pankey

Photo by Patti Jo South Dakota

Proud Father- Native Pride - Photo Credit Mye Taliman

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Inspirational music: Paul Winter Consort, "Icarus," 1972

Musical inspiration from 1972: the Paul Winter Consort, "Icarus," live.