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It's all about choices: the Matrix is real. We Are Spiritual Beings having a Human Experience.

It's all about choices: the Matrix is real. We Are Spiritual Beings having a Human Experience.

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Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, New Hampshire, North Carolina, NY/NJ, Tennessee, Washington...the U.S., and Southeast Asia & China, United States
With a B.A. in psychology and a masters in education, I'm a psychological counselor-advisor, college professor-academic adviser, writer, music journalist: a Cosmic Tuning Fork; LightWorker; Intuitive Mentor. I Activate People in understanding their Life Goals, individual Soul Lessons, and Inner Truths to achieve personal growth & happiness, and have fun too. I am called Starman by my tribal family; the turtle is our totem animal. mitchLOP8@yahoo.com / skype mitchell.lopate

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Buddhist wisdom with a truckload of..."who ASKED for this problem?"

You've heard the saying "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade."  Try this book's title instead when you've hit the rough points in life:  "Who asked for these problems? Not me!"  Oh, you did indeed ask for lessons in patience, forgiveness, simplicity, and other ways of learning to "live in the 'now' moment."  

The 108 stories in Who Ordered this Truckload of Dung? offer thoughtful commentary on everything from love and commitment to fear and pain. Drawing from his own life experience, as well as traditional Buddhist folk tales, author Ajahn Brahm (born Peter Betts, the son of a struggling family in England), came from a working-class background and went to Latymer Upper School. He won a scholarship to study Theoretical physics at Cambridge University in the late 1960s. After graduating from Cambridge he taught in high school for one year before traveling to Thailand to become a monk and train with the Ajahn Chah Bodhinyana Mahathera. Brahm was ordained in Bangkok at the age of twenty-three by the Abbot of Wat Saket. He subsequently spent nine years studying and training in the forest meditation tradition under Ajahn Chah.

He uses over 30 years of spiritual growth as a monk to spin delightful tales that can be enjoyed in silence or read aloud to friends and family. Featuring titles such as "The Two-Finger Smile" and "The Worm and His Lovely Pile of Dung," these wry and witty stories provide playful, pithy takes on the basic building blocks of everyday life. Suitable for children, adults, and anyone in between, this eloquent volume wraps insight and inspiration inside of a good old yarn.

Publishers Weekly:

"More than statistics and theories, we really trust anecdotes and narratives. Our brains and beings are wired to learn deeply and easily via stories, and this splendid collection of 108 Buddhist-based tales proves the point with lasting, gentle, pervasive teachings."

"Brahm, a former Cambridge University theoretical physics scholar, was ordained in Bangkok at age 23 and spent nine subsequent years in forest meditation under Venerable Ajahn Chah. He is now an abbot and spiritual director of the Buddhist Society of Western Australia. In the dozen compelling and practical sections on topics like perfection, love, commitment, fear, pain, anger, forgiveness, happiness, freedom and humility, he weaves a long, rich tapestry of understanding using short threads of stories only a couple of pages long. Many tales lead one to the other, but each also stands alone. Resurrecting several "chestnuts" as well as crafting new stories, Brahm avoids the pitfall of esoteric, inscrutable renderings sometimes found in Buddhist writing. Instead, without compromising integrity, he favors modern cadences and references (e.g., iPods and the World Wildlife Fund) to make the stories sail along. Especially resonant if slowly savored, this is a wonderful collection that can be enjoyed by a broad audience."

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